Eco-h2o Water Conservation Systems

All you need to know about rainwater harvesting and saving water

Water Stability in South Africa.

South Africa is home approximately 54 Million people. We are fast running out water.  We are currently experiencing drought in many parts of the county and our dams are running dry quickly. As more and more people migrate into cities from rural areas the pressure for the city to meet the water demands is ever increasing. With the old infrastructure and poor service delivery from municipalities, homes can go days without water.

Image result for pictures of water dams in south africa

Harvesting of rainwater is not a new concept. It is still used extensively in rural areas where there is no access to piped water. Rainwater is pure water that is “cleaned” naturally through the process of evaporation and condensation i.e.: the water cycle. Rainwater is “soft” water that contains no chemicals or minerals, unlike our municipal water where calcium, magnesium and chlorine are to be found. This water is collected from the roof and filtered at source to remove dirt and debris and keep the water in the tanks clean. This water can then safely be pressurised and sent into the home or business for general use.

Rainwater harvesting not only provides a sustainable alternative source of water, but has also been shown to reduce water consumption purely by raising awareness of users that install systems. People who harvest rainwater tend to alter their water usage habits and reduce their overall consumption, without significantly changing their lifestyles. It is a simple way to reduce water consumption with the real-time cost benefit in reduced water bills.

The average household consumes approximately 240lt of water per person per day. That means that for a household with four people in it, 960lt of water is used every day which equates to 350’400lt per year.  Harvesting from a roof area of 200m² a family home could collect over 120’000ℓ of rainwater per annum.

Would you believe that only 3% of your total water consumed is used for drinking and cooking.  The rest is used for the garden (35%), toilet flushing (29%), bathing/ showering (20%) and for laundry (13%).

If every South African home harvested Rainwater for use in the garden, pool or even the home, it would reduce the demand for water on municipalities, it would be good for the environment and it would offer you water security while saving you money.

 

Rainwater Harvesting System

The Rainwater harvesting system will divert and sieve the rainwater from your roof though a self-cleaning filter box fitted to your downpipe and fill your water tank.  From your water tank the water is then pumped (via an in-line filter) to the entire property. There is a municipal top-up on the tank set at your required level (around 1’000ℓ) ensuring you are never without water. This will reduce your dependence on the main water supply.

The system guarantees you water at all times by allowing the introduction of mains water should you run out of rainwater.

 

Grey water reuse.

Grey water is defined as water from baths, showers, hand basins and clothes washing machines or the laundry. Any water from any other source (toilet water and from kitchen and bidet’s) is considered black water and must be allowed to proceed to the sewer and treated by some sort of sewerage treatment works.

A bath uses 120 litres and a shower 80 litres of water. When used, that water is called grey water. You pay for it, and then it all goes down the drain.

Grey water is the solution to the problems relating to demand and supply management of water not only in South Africa, but worldwide.

Grey water is the biggest contributor to wastage of water and though knowledge of this very useful source is growing generally, this knowledge is still woeful. At best 33% of water consumed in the home is normally thrown away and at worst perhaps 50%. It is preposterous that any municipality allows this precious source of good water to be thrown away.

If we look at the figures above, showering/bathing and laundry combined total some 115’632lt per year. This grey water is then pumped to the garden keeping it watered all year round at no extra cost. We have already established that we use approximately 122’640lt per year on keeping our gardens watered so the water needed for the garden is reduced to 7’008lt per year.

This water is slowly filtered and replenishes our underground aquifers. Added to this, it would remove up to 90% of the volumes entering our sewage works. This would dramatically reduce the running costs of these works as by far the biggest cost is pumping of water.

 

June 6, 2016 at 4:10 pm Comments (0)

SA Water Crisis

Although 89.4% of households in South Africa have access to piped water, less than half of them enjoy water in the comfort of their own homes.

According to the General Household Survey 2015, released by Statistician General Pali Lehohla on Thursday, an estimated 45.8% of South Africans had (more…)

June 6, 2016 at 3:10 pm Comments (0)

Conflict over water and coal amid SA drought

Facing one of the worst droughts in memory, SA’s leaders have doubled down on their support of the water-intensive coal industry, explains Keith Schneider

Until a ferocious drought withered crops, turned rivers to trickles, and dried up municipal drinking water supplies, one of Limpopo province’s distinctions was the ample sun and good soil that made it South Africa’s premier producer of fruits and vegetables. (more…)

May 30, 2016 at 4:04 pm Comments (0)

How to SAVE water

The average household consumes approximately 240lt of water per person per day. That means that for a household with four people in it, 960lt of water is used every day which equates to 350’400lt per year!

How is this usage broken down? Would you believe that only 3% of your total water consumed is used for drinking and cooking? The rest is used for the garden (35%), toilet flushing (29%), bathing/ showering (20%) and for laundry (13%).  If we convert these percentages to volumes, the average home uses 122’640lt per year to water the garden, 101’616lt to flush your toilet, 70’080lt to keep ourselves clean and 45’552lt to keep our clothes clean! The other 10’512lt per year is used for drinking and cooking.

Eco-h2o Water Conservation looks to match water quality with application. Municipal water for drinking (for now anyway but this could change), rainwater for showering, toilet flushing and laundry and lastly, grey water for garden irrigation. A combination of all of our systems can save you up to 90% on your water bills!


(more…)

May 10, 2016 at 11:13 am Comments (0)

SA’s looming water crisis – the less we have, the dirtier it is

Photo: Residents push a wheelbarrow with water containers leaving a water distribution point in the rural farming town of Senekal, South Africa, 10 February 2016. EPA/SHIRAAZ MOHAMED

Our rivers are awash with sewage, and we are soon going to be running short of water. HEALTH-E’s Kerry Cullinan reports on a looming health crisis.

A swim in a lagoon on the KwaZulu-Natal south coast cost historian RW Johnson his leg in 2009. Flesh-eating bacteria entered a cut on his foot, causing necrotising fasciitis – a terrifying condition in which bacteria poison the connective fascia tissue at a rapid rate. The condition kills at least half of all those it infects. (more…)

May 9, 2016 at 1:04 pm Comments (0)

Rainwater Harvesting Systems

Rainwater harvesting systems can look and sound complicated but it is actually an easy and ancient method to simply catch free water from the sky.  The water harvested is stored in tanks to use in households for watering the garden, flushing toilets, showering, washing clothes and cars and topping up pools and ponds.

 

  • If you own your property and intend to stay put, a Rainwater Harvesting system is a great investment. Water bills are set to rise with more regular and higher price hikes and your initial Rainwater harvesting system investment will repay itself handsomely over the medium term.

 

  • If you have a large garden, there are more than 3 people living in your house and everyone is reliant on municipal water (i.e. metered supply), you will benefit from a Rainwater Harvesting system.

 

  • If you have a modern kitchen and more than one bathroom, chances are that you would be saving money if you start using rainwater instead of municipal water.

 

  • As Rainwater Harvesting reduces surface water, it will reduce the likelihood of flooding on your property by up to 60%.

 

  • Rainwater is better for your garden as it has a balanced ph and is free of chemicals such as chlorine.

 

  • The running costs of Rainwater Harvesting system are low as the system is uncomplicated and extremely reliable.

 

  • JoJo Tanks carry an 8-year warranty and are subjected to rigorous testing to ensure that they offer guaranteed quality and are able to store the heavy water loads required.

 

  • Water tanks are extremely efficient collectors: a 50sqm roof can harvest up to 23 000L of water per year.

 

  • Up to 86% of household water needs can be met through rainwater harvesting.

 

  • Rainwater Harvesing is planet friendly and reduces your carbon footprint.

 

 

For more information, call me on 083 654 9613 or e-mail me on sarah@eco-h2o.co.za

 

 

April 6, 2016 at 2:51 pm Comments (0)

Water scarcity problems

According to the Water Efficiency Report released by ActionAid South Africa on Tuesday, big business should be taking the lead in helping to deal with the country’s water crisis. Because of the threat that water scarcity problems pose to both the social and economic stability of the republic, it urges industry to become involved, at least as much as government, in addressing the issue.

Perhaps there is even a space for a water innovation industry to sprout, much as the renewable energy industry has burgeoned in the face of policy uncertainty and pressing need. (more…)

April 6, 2016 at 11:45 am Comments (0)

Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater Harvesting.

 

We are faced with a water crisis due to the scarcity of usable water resources. In world terms, only three percent of all water on Earth is freshwater and most of this is frozen in the ice caps. In South Africa, there are no more rivers that could be dammed to store fresh water. Our existing dams are being polluted and the threat of Acid Mine Drainage will only compound the problem in Gauteng. (more…)

March 14, 2016 at 2:05 pm Comments (0)

How to save water without changing your lifestyle.

How to save water without changing your lifestyle.

The average household consumes approximately 240lt of water per person per day. That means that for a household with four people in it, 960lt of water is used every day which equates to 350’400lt per year!

How is this usage broken down? Would you believe that only 3% of your total water consumed is used for drinking and cooking? The rest is used for the garden (35%), toilet flushing (29%), bathing/ showering (20%) and for laundry (13%). If we covert these percentages to volumes, the average home uses 122’640lt per year to water the garden, 101’616lt to flush your toilet, 70’080lt to keep ourselves clean and 45’552lt to keep our clothes clean! The other 10’512lt per year is used for drinking and cooking.

Eco-h2o Water Conservation look to match water quality with application. Municipal water for drinking (for now anyway but this could change), rainwater for showering, toilet flushing and laundry and lastly, grey water for garden irrigation. A combination of all of our systems can save you up to 90% on your water bills!

Broken down into each application, we look at the various ways to save water.

Toilet flushing.

An average cistern holds approximately 10lt and is emptied each time the toilet is flushed. Our Multi-Flush toilet mechanism allows you to control the amount of water used each time you flush the toilet. In some instances, clearing the pan requires as little as 1lt for men and 2lt for women. As you can see, each flush can save you 8lt which adds up very quickly. If each person flushes twice per day, your saving is 23’360lt of water per year!

Grey water reuse.

Our Greywater System collects water from baths, showers, hand basins and washing machines. No “black water” can be used i.e.: toilet water, dishwashers and kitchen sinks. If we look at the figures above, showering/bathing and laundry combined total some 115’632lt per year. This grey water is then pumped to the garden keeping it watered all year round at no extra cost. We have already established that we use approximately 122’640lt per year on keeping our gardens watered so the water needed for the garden is reduced to 7’008lt per year.

Rainwater harvesting.

If you harvest your rainwater, your water savings are even bigger as the water you harvest is used for bathing, showering, laundry and toilet flushing. Rainfall is seasonal, but for the rainy months, you could be self sufficient in terms of water supply. Rainwater is collected from your downpipes through our Rain Runner filters which remove leaves, dirt and debris that may have accumulated on your roof between rains, thus ensuring that only clean water enters your rainwater tank. Municipal water is introduced to the tank as well ensuring you a backup water supply if there is no rain or municipal water in your area.

Eco-h2o Water Conservation has 7 years’ experience in water conservation with over 2000 installations (residential and commercial) countrywide.

For a free quote contact Sarah on sarah@eco-h2o.co.za or visit www.eco-h2o.co.za for more information.

March 9, 2016 at 3:54 pm Comments (0)

Acid mine drainage is still a problem

Image result for acid mine drainage images

JOHANNESBURG – Eyewitness News has learned government spent R25 million on a ‘feasibility report’ to establish a long-term solution for acid mine drainage, but two years later the report’s findings have not been implemented.

In 2012, urgent concerns were raised that millions of litres of acid mine water under Johannesburg would flood (more…)

February 11, 2016 at 1:12 pm Comments (0)

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