How secure is our water resources?

The scarcity of water resources is not overstated.

 

A 2016 report by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) indicated South Africa receives half of the world average for rainfall, and that water demand would increase by 32 per cent by 2030.

In a local context, water deficit is a very real phenomenon.

 

At uThukela Water’s AGM earlier this year, infographics showed even a 1.5 per cent growth factor would result in water deficits for Amajuba District by around 2030.

Thus the need to preserve this resource is paramount.

In terms of the area’s most well-known body of water – the Chelmsford/ Ntshingwayo Dam – has not been above 80 per cent of its capacity since September 28 this year.  This is despite heavy rainfall during the week.

Compared to a month ago, the dam has dropped almost three per cent in level, and by around six per cent since August (two months ago).

 

Local environmentalist, Bradley Gibbons said every drop had to be appreciated. “The words ‘semi-arid’ that are used to describe South Africa’s rainfall will always explain the fact that we must never take water for granted.”

Mankind cannot survive without this precious resource.  Gibbons said even if the dam reached 100 per cent, it did not mean residents could ignore a tap not switched off fully, for example.

He used the low level of the Zaaihoek Dam (near Wakkerstroom) as an example.  “Therefore, some areas in South Africa may have had a lot of rain but others are very badly affected.”

 

Eco-H2o is a water conservation company that would be able to assist you with rainwater harvesting systems, greywater reuse systems, back-up water supply systems, pool back-wash recycling systems and toilet flushing systems.   When you have our systems installed in your home not only could you reduce your water bill by up to 90%, you will also never be without water.  We are also suppliers of JoJo water tanks.

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